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BlackFelyne

My only problem with PC building.

23 posts in this topic

I read tons of reviews and feedback of others.

I do want to try PC gaming and building a PC, but the only thing stopping me is the fear of receiving a faulty part or the build failing after a short amount of time...

I sometimes wonder how some people can just throw these worries away, building maybe a 500-1000 dollar PC and it ends up messing up...

I dunno if PC gaming would work for me if I worry about this stuff.

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Hey man I understand, but dont stress this early on. If you want any help picking out parts ( because they have to be compatible) just pm me or talk to any one else here. Try putting together pcpartpicker.com list and its auto tells you whats compatible and whats not. It also gives the best sites to buy them from.

I can basically assure you that as long as your not ordering a open box part. 99% of the time the parts gonna be in perfect condition. And if its not basically ALL manufacture and sites allow for a full RMA, refund, repair and replace service. So its not like the end of the world if it does happen (And its super rare you get a faulty product)

Only time this should be a stressful process it putting it together. However it's harder than you think to break things. Im 16 and just built my own Pc from scratch, its way easier than you think. Wer'e here to help.

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Plus those reviews you eead on sites are insanely skewed.

Think about it would someone with a perfect working product take the time to give a review and great score, more so than say, someone who got a lemon or is just unhappy and wants a refund and is pissed beyond belief so makes 5 accounts to give something a bad score?

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PC building (and especially component shopping) is one of my favorite pass times. I know it can be hard at first, but it can be well worth it in the end. They've actually made it much easier today than it used to be. I do play mostly on my PS3/4 these days, but I'll always have a PC for strategy games. Trust me, it's like a good girlfriend; well worth the frustration.

 

If you have ANY issues with picking parts and assembly, just let us know. I'm sure any number of PC gamers on here would be delighted to help.

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Faulty parts are one in a million. I've had one bad motherboard and I've been assembling my stuff since I was 16 now. And there's really no way to "mess it up" it's as simple as Lego really. The only way to really mess things up is choosing the wrong components but that we can probably help with.

On the factory defect thing, returns are usually easy in the shops themselves around here, I suppose that being in the civilized world and being able to get a replacement from the manufacturer makes it even easier, still frustrating but easy.

 

 

Plus those reviews you eead on sites are insanely skewed.

Think about it would someone with a perfect working product take the time to give a review and great score, more so than say, someone who got a lemon or is just unhappy and wants a refund and is pissed beyond belief so makes 5 accounts to give something a bad score?

While valid, some things like Power Supply Units are a better safe than sorry deal.

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Faulty parts happen, but that can be said for nearly everything, not just in relation to building PCs. It isn't difficult to build one at all. It was mentioned above, PCpartpicker is a great site to use, shows you great deals as well as compatibility for the parts you are looking at. 

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I know that kind of feeling. I am actually planning to build another PC from scratch this summer and the chances of getting a faulty product is very slim. Besides, the best experience is when you are building a PC and testing it out to see it work. There was one incident when my friend brought a EVGA GTX 780 Ti and it was a defect when she got it. Even if this was the case, the manufacturer does provide RMA policy. As of right now, I'm just looking at what PC components to get (the best part of PC research for me)  ;)

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The main thing that keeps me from getting into PC gaming other than the expense is that i have no idea what people are talking about when they talk about specs. 

Example http://angryjoeshow.com/ajsa/topic/18060-pc-upgrade/#entry203238

i have no idea what this means! i don't want to spend time getting my games to run at max performance i just want to play them. Im not trying to bash on PC gaming I just feel it has a big learning curve.

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The main thing that keeps me from getting into PC gaming other than the expense is that i have no idea what people are talking about when they talk about specs. 

 

Feel free to ask Frozen! We'll be happy to explain anything you're curious about. I'll always maintain, even though the "PC Master Race" folks hate me for it, that PC gaming is not for everyone. However, if you've got some money and the desire to learn, the rewards of PC gaming can be tremendous and well worth it.

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Well to avoid that, there are several parts that I avoid getting in the first place. PNY, Rosewill and Foxconn are manufacturers I avoid like the plague while Crucial, Antech, EVGA, ASUS, Corsair, Cooler Master, Gigabyte are for the most part trusted.

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It's pretty simple really, choose a sturdy motherboard, a processor and GPU that suits whatever you're trying to play, have the peripherals and HDs(a decent monitor, mouse and keyboard go a long way.) pick a power supply and RAM sticks and you're pretty much set. That's about 5 or 6 major items you have to pick up, it's not really that much work when you think about it.
Sometimes it doesn't turn on because something's not connected right or the case switch is in the wrong power panel(most common problem I've seem with people's new computers not turning on after assembly.) but I enjoy the problem solving myself. In the end it's pretty much like a strategy game where you spend a bit of money(or a considerable sum if it's your first computer I suppose.)


Mythbusting - PC is not omfg expensive, the average gaming PC that runs everything at mid-max(mid-high usually being pretty close to consoles.) goes for about $700 minus the monitor and other things everyone has, furthermore you don't need to buy everything at the same time, like a super high DPI mouse or a giant monitor. But best of all, the games themselves are largely cheaper and if not cheaper on release they'll be cheaper faster than on consoles which in my opinion offsets the cost difference, which isn't that much at all to begin with.


Third world trivia - I don't know if there's trade-ins or people who buy used parts in the US and Europe but around here I can always find someone to buy my used parts so I make sure to time my upgrades in a fashion that what I'm getting rid of isn't completely useless, that saves me a good amount of money actually, I effectively became "next-gen" for about $150.

Qnz917 likes this

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There is no such thing as hardware without faults.

 

MB/CPU/GPU and etc all come under warranty just like any other piece of hardware.

 

 

 

Building up a PC would offer a solid overall experience along with  gaming

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PC is not omfg expensive, the average gaming PC that runs everything at mid-max(mid-high usually being pretty close to consoles.) goes for about $700 minus the monitor and other things everyone has, furthermore you don't need to buy everything at the same time, like a super high DPI mouse or a giant monitor. But best of all, the games themselves are largely cheaper and if not cheaper on release they'll be cheaper faster than on consoles which in my opinion offsets the cost difference, which isn't that much at all to begin with.

Personally, if my machine can only play something on medium, I'd rather just play it on console. If I'm going to play it on PC, I'd prefer it to look waaaay better than it does on consoles. One of the reasons why I personally wouldn't make a low to mid range PC.

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There is no such thing as hardware without faults.

 

MB/CPU/GPU and etc all come under warranty just like any other piece of hardware.

 

 

 

Building up a PC would offer a solid overall experience along with  gaming

I already know of these perks with PC gaming. I hear a lot of people talking about it especially in the new games that are coming out, though I dunno if it's just because they feel that they HAVE to, or they just want to gloat about their PC specs.

It's just my nature to worry about this stuff really...Especially when it comes to how much I'd go for to get a reliable PC.

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understandable concerns

my old hard drive failed after 14months (bloody WD), but still i just replaced it with a new one and treated myself to a SSD so good times :)

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I dunno if it's just because they feel that they HAVE to, or they just want to gloat about their PC specs.

A lot of PC users will do this, and though they're right, they can be quite dickish about it too. What you get out of PC gaming will depend on the effort (and funds) that you put to it. I say, if you really want to get to build a PC, go for it. I'm sure a lot of people on these forums, or on Tom's Hardware forums would be able to help you out if you have any questions.

 

At the risk of starting another argument, here's a thread that talked about the ups and downs of it.

 

Lastly, PC Gaming Wiki is your friend.

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Personally, if my machine can only play something on medium, I'd rather just play it on console. If I'm going to play it on PC, I'd prefer it to look waaaay better than it does on consoles. One of the reasons why I personally wouldn't make a low to mid range PC.

mid-high =/= low-mid and well I'm running pretty much every game in existence at high/extreme right now. With a better GPU(Have a GTX760) I could crank it all up to 32x super AA and play everyting on extreme dx12, but max with low AA is more than enough really.

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mid-high =/= low-mid and well I'm running pretty much every game in existence at high/extreme right now. With a better GPU(Have a GTX760) I could crank it all up to 32x super AA and play everyting on extreme dx12, but max with low AA is more than enough really.

Still stands, if I'm gonna play something on PC, I prefer to be playing on maxed out settings, even if it's just 30 fps. It's why I was asking how well my system could run Watchdogs in those threads; to help me decide what system to get it on.

 

I will say that I'm a bit lenient about AA though. The lowest I'll tolerate for AA is 8x as long as everything else is on the highest settings.

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A lot of PC users will do this, and though they're right, they can be quite dickish about it too. What you get out of PC gaming will depend on the effort (and funds) that you put to it. I say, if you really want to get to build a PC, go for it. I'm sure a lot of people on these forums, or on Tom's Hardware forums would be able to help you out if you have any questions.

 

At the risk of starting another argument, here's a thread that talked about the ups and downs of it.

 

Lastly, PC Gaming Wiki is your friend.

I don't want to start an arguement ^^; 

I was just saying. I'm always a but cautious ^^;

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I don't want to start an arguement ^^; 

I was just saying. I'm always a but cautious ^^;

 

No worries DNR, faulty parts in my experience are few and far between. I actually can't remember the last time I got one, to be honest. If you do decide to start your adventure into PC gaming, just know we're here and happy to help. If you are worried about doing it yourself, you could also use a site that will build it for you. I don't know any personally, but I've seen a lot of folks on here who have used one and had good results. In fact, it might be the way to go with your concerns, at least for your first PC. If you decide then that PC gaming is for you, then you could delve in further whenever upgrade time comes around.

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Still stands, if I'm gonna play something on PC, I prefer to be playing on maxed out settings, even if it's just 30 fps. It's why I was asking how well my system could run Watchdogs in those threads; to help me decide what system to get it on.

 

I will say that I'm a bit lenient about AA though. The lowest I'll tolerate for AA is 8x as long as everything else is on the highest settings.

That's quite a weird attitude for someone who bears playing on console at all, the average port at "extreme" even with no aa looks better than the console version. Titanfall is the latest concrete example I can produce and then there's the mouse and keyboard, old friends of yore.
 

No worries DNR, faulty parts in my experience are few and far between. I actually can't remember the last time I got one, to be honest. If you do decide to start your adventure into PC gaming, just know we're here and happy to help. If you are worried about doing it yourself, you could also use a site that will build it for you. I don't know any personally, but I've seen a lot of folks on here who have used one and had good results. In fact, it might be the way to go with your concerns, at least for your first PC. If you decide then that PC gaming is for you, then you could delve in further whenever upgrade time comes around.

You don't remember that trauma?! I wish I was like that.

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That's quite a weird attitude for someone who bears playing on console at all, the average port at "extreme" even with no aa looks better than the console version. Titanfall is the latest concrete example I can produce and then there's the mouse and keyboard, old friends of yore.

I admit that it is, my philosophy on PC is "Go big, or go home", which is weirder if you consider that I've been on a laptop since moving to Canada in 2004 I guess. I just got used to the convenience of being able to move the laptop around, plopping it in front of me, while I watch TV I suppose. I payed as much as a high-end rig for this, but it's suiting my needs and have played everything I've tried on it on max settings, so I'm ok with it. Haven't tried what it can do with "The Witcher 2" yet though, hearing about that Ubersampling, not entirely sure it can get that.

 

As for the Mouse and keyboard, I played and finished "Bioshock Infinite" and all of its DLC on this laptop (as you can see from my Steam signature)  completely with a controller. Same goes with the current "Tomb Raider". I also use it on "Battlefield 4" when I'm on vehicles, and unlocked everything for the stealth jet with it. On console side, I have no problems using it for "Halo", "Killzone" or other shooters like that. I could care less about it really. But that's again my personal preference.

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I love the comfort of using a controller. A mouse is easily more precise, but after using one all day at work, it really hurts my hand and I can't stand using it at home. In fact, on the PC I almost always use a controller for games that support it over keyboard and mouse.

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