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Nya`

Why would EA develop the same game twice?

23 posts in this topic

This has puzzled me for years and I have still yet to find another example of this, or an answer for that matter.

 

In 2002 EA created and released Need for Speed: Hot Pursuit 2. This game released for the Xbox, Gamecube, PC & The PlayStation 2. There is one remarkable difference though, the PlayStation 2 version is a completely different game. It's based on the same concept and idea but a different branch of EA developed it. It looks different, it plays different, it's setup different, it's a different game entirely.

 

It's like telling two different people to create the same thing, it will be the same idea but unique to each persons design of it.

 

Here is the Xbox, Gamecube & PC version of the game developed by EA Seattle.

 

 

Here is the superior PlayStation 2 version of the game developed by EA Black Box.

 

 

Why would a company do this?

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Money ofcourse it is a business afterall.

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Because why the f#ck not?

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Money ofcourse it is a business afterall.

That doesn't make sense though, it would obviously be less profitable to pay two development teams and pay for two development cycles dedicated to the same game.

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Because the architecture was very different back then.
AFAIK, the PS2 and PS3 have been hardware-level more powerful than XBox and 360.
BUT the graphical engines (like Unreal) were optimized for the Microsoft hardware.
So, many games were developed in PC workstations, then optimized for XBox and the games felt like "ports" from Xbox into Playstation.
By focusing a dev team to work directly on the platform, the game would perform better.... theorically.

I'd rather make the game and then split the dev group to optimize for each platform, but I'm crazy..... or rather EA is..... maybe all of us are ;)

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Because gamers are suckers, look at the Sims, they'll buy anything instead of supporting indie developers.

 

.... *glances at his Sims 4 torrent download* :(

 

Also, speaking as someone who is messing around with the stuff, it doesn't matter how much you mess with a games engine and upgrade the graphics if the art assets stay exactly the same. A lot of the time rather than actually basing their decisions on the data and features behind a piece of software used in development people are sold by the marketing and raging fanboism.

 

I will actually give you this article about OpenGL and Directx that I once found, which explains this sort of thing perfectly.

 

http://blog.wolfire.com/2010/01/Why-you-should-use-OpenGL-and-not-DirectX

 

Very recently I have begun to use the Blender game engine and the amount of hatred I've seen it attract from mainly Unity 3D users is staggering to look at on the internet and what their main complaints can amount to is very basic/trivial things like "I don't like the interface" you will see this kind of arguing over Maya and 3DS Max. I definitely prefer Maya and don't like 3DS Max but that's just due to personal preference I don't actually go out of my way to attack it because I know 3DS Max is suited for different things and people like that interface more and so on.

 

I also did some research on Directx 9 and Directx 10, in reality Directx 10 does very little different from Directx 9 and it's really only due to the Microsoft marketing machine that anybody thinks differently and looks at the numbers, same for the Xbox One and Playstation 4, when you actually investigate and compare the numbers and the components very little is different, it's all an illusion.

 

That said, I could be just completely biased because unless the professional version is superior to an open source version of some kind of software I will always pick open source :P

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Because the architecture was very different back then.

AFAIK, the PS2 and PS3 have been hardware-level more powerful than XBox and 360.

BUT the graphical engines (like Unreal) were optimized for the Microsoft hardware.

So, many games were developed in PC workstations, then optimized for XBox and the games felt like "ports" from Xbox into Playstation.

By focusing a dev team to work directly on the platform, the game would perform better.... theorically.

I'd rather make the game and then split the dev group to optimize for each platform, but I'm crazy..... or rather EA is..... maybe all of us are ;)

The Xbox was twice as powerful as the PlayStation 2 as far as hardware is concernerd, the only common denominator between the Xbox, Gamecube and the PC is they're all x86, and I don't see that being the reason as countless other EA games for these shared platforms did not do this.

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Hot Pursuit 2 and Most Wanted(the PS2 game) was the best need for speed games and my only ones I still have the disks but my PS2 is dead.

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they'll buy anything instead of supporting indie developers.

Indie =/= good

Steam is full of indies(both the serious and shady kind.) now and the complaints are through the roof lately.

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This is pretty odd even by EA standards.

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Because it's EA silly 

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I also did some research on Directx 9 and Directx 10, in reality Directx 10 does very little different from Directx 9 and it's really only due to the Microsoft marketing machine that anybody thinks differently and looks at the numbers, same for the Xbox One and Playstation 4, when you actually investigate and compare the numbers and the components very little is different, it's all an illusion.

That said, I could be just completely biased (...)

AFAIK, the real jump was from DX10 to 11, wasn't it?

Also, we're all biased, based on our past experiences ;)

The Xbox was twice as powerful as the PlayStation 2 as far as hardware is concernerd, the only common denominator between the Xbox, Gamecube and the PC is they're all x86, and I don't see that being the reason as countless other EA games for these shared platforms did not do this.

Ok. Might have gotten my numbers mixed (an/or may be biased due to my Xbox being frying the second day I turned it on).

An yep, up until that gen all machines were still very different, unlike this current generation.

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EA's stance about not making a new engine because it took a long time to develop or it was "too expensive" (IN QUOTES) to make a new engine.

Crazycrab likes this

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EA's stance about not making a new engine because it took a long time to develop or it was "too expensive" (IN QUOTES) to make a new engine.

 

Tell me about it!  The EA Sports FIFA engine is so old that.... well.......

 

51aOOpHAEzL.jpg

 

Do I really need a punch line?

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Isn't this sort of like how Splinter Cell on the Xbox was different from the one on the PS2 and Gamecube? Or how the Wii version of certain games are completely different from the PS3 and 360 versions?

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Isn't this sort of like how Splinter Cell on the Xbox was different from the one on the PS2 and Gamecube?

The only Splinter Cell game I remember being very different was Double Agent on next gen and Double Agent on last gen. If I remember right the first Splinter Cell just looked better on the Xbox, had an extra level on the PS2, and had an extra gadget on the Gamecube.

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The only Splinter Cell game I remember being very different was Double Agent on next gen and Double Agent on last gen. If I remember right the first Splinter Cell just looked better on the Xbox, had an extra level on the PS2, and had an extra gadget on the Gamecube.

I think some of the Spider-Man games are different depending on platform too. PS3 and 360 would be the same, but different for the Wii.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Amazing_Spider-Man_%282012_video_game%29

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spider-Man_2_%28video_game%29

 

Two examples I know off the top of my head.

 

Also, wasn't this also happening during the NES or SNES era?

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I think some of the Spider-Man games are different depending on platform too. PS3 and 360 would be the same, but different for the Wii.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Amazing_Spider-Man_%282012_video_game%29

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spider-Man_2_%28video_game%29

 

Two examples I know off the top of my head.

 

Also, wasn't this also happening during the NES or SNES era?

That's a different situation though, that is two systems which fall into a different generation of hardware in terms of processing power and the Wii which was technically last generation hardware in comparison to them. Obviously they're not going to run on the same engine or be the same game due to hardware limitations. In terms of NFS: HP2 all the hardware was relatively on the same playing field, I can't find a logical reason why the PS2 got a completely different version.

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That's a different situation though, that is two systems which fall into a different generation of hardware in terms of processing power and the Wii which was technically last generation hardware in comparison to them. Obviously they're not going to run on the same engine or be the same game due to hardware limitations. In terms of NFS: HP2 all the hardware was relatively on the same playing field, I can't find a logical reason why the PS2 got a completely different version.

What about that second link? Spider-man 2, the PC version was completely different from the console versions.

 

In any case, could it be possible that Sony just payed for a different version? If that's the case the weird part is that they'd have this other version still be named the same as the others.

 

Also, how much more powerful was the PS2 and Xbox compared to the Gamecube? Asking because I really don't know. I wasn't really looking into console power back then.

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Also, how much more powerful was the PS2 and Xbox compared to the Gamecube? Asking because I really don't know. I wasn't really looking into console power back then.

If I remember right the PS2 was the weakest of the three.

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Also, how much more powerful was the PS2 and Xbox compared to the Gamecube? Asking because I really don't know. I wasn't really looking into console power back then.

 

 

If I remember right the PS2 was the weakest of the three.

 

It's not quite as straight forward as that, unlike today consoles weren't designed like PC's (with the exception of maybe the XBox).  Rather than having an operating system with CPU running with the show and a GPU backing it up with the software loading into a RAM storage (a very abridged description I know don't crucify me for it).  They used a multitude of propitiatory hardware components with minimal operating software to do the same job and they all did it in different way.

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Ask the same question to the CoD franchise and you'll get your answer. Money. People want something that appeals to them and it's familiar. If it's familiar and they like it then they'll buy it.

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